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New Panther Warehousing Booking App Reduces Failed Delivery Charges

New Panther Warehousing Booking App reduces failed delivery charges

Panther Warehousing has introduced a new app which can slash crippling losses from late deliveries.

New research involving 300 retailers in the UK, US and Germany revealed that 65% said that failed or late deliveries are a significant cost to their business.

In the UK a total of 5.6% of orders do not arrive at their destination at an average cost to the retailer of £14.35, according to the data from PCA Predict.

And this does not take into account the damage to the retailer’s brand reputation that poor delivery causes.

But Panther Warehousing , the specialist in two-man, white-glove delivery, has developed an app to massively reduce failed deliveries – with spectacular results.

Prior to the app being available, Panther Warehousing would call the customer from its UK call centre to arrange delivery but only one quarter of the calls were answered first time.

However, the introduction of the app produced instant results.

Nearly three-quarters of deliveries were successfully arranged with no follow-up phone calls needed and initial contact rising from just 20% to nearly 80%.

The innovation not only smoothed the path of people trying to arrange the delivery of appliances, beds and other large goods, it had other benefits for Panther and its clients.

Inbound calls to Panther’s call centre dropped by half, easing the workload and allowing staff to concentrate on smoothing the delivery journey, while for clients the streamlined service cut delivery costs by up to £2.95 a time.

Colin McCarthy, MD of Panther Warehousing, said: “Our new App is a win-win-win. We are happier, our clients are happier and most importantly, the customers are happier.

“It really has made everyone’s lives easier and has helped to significantly bring down the costs of failed deliveries.

“Previously we were having trouble reaching customers by phone – people are busy, many are at work or travelling, or are in situations where they don’t want to take a phone call.

“With the app, they get a message telling them their item has been ordered and if they can’t answer straightaway it is easy for them to use the app later to arrange delivery at a time convenient to them.

“It is discreet and simple to use so if they are in a meeting or on a noisy train or out shopping they can take make the arrangements via the app in just a few minutes when they get the opportunity.

“At Panther we always put ourselves in the shoes of the end customer to see how we can improve our service to save them time and trouble – and the App certainly does that!”

Customers can also check the details of their orders through the booking screen. Information can be branded to clients’ requirements, handle “in-flight” changes and the App is suitable for any client trading style, thus adding value to Panther’s offering.

Panther was among the first to bring the immediacy of the high street to the more sedate world of delivery.

It started by offering next-day delivery and is continually improving services and winning new customers.

With its two-hour delivery slots, late 10pm cut-off point for next-day delivery, seven day a week operation and more recently bank holiday and Sunday collections, it has built up an enviable roll call of customers, including big name brands, which has led to the company growing from £5 million in 2010 to £55 million in 2017.

Panther’s ‘day of choice’ delivery service – where customers can select a day weeks in advance – is popular with people who want furniture delivered after they have completed home redecoration or renovations, or who have to plan ahead to have a day at home to receive a delivery.

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