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Carrier Transicold UK rolls-out Higher-Voltage Electrics course for service partners

Carrier Transicold UK is raising industry training standards even higher with the introduction of a compulsory new course in higher-voltage electrics for its service engineers. The course focuses on safety when working with, and around, high-voltage electrics – as found in many of the latest generations of transport refrigeration systems. Carrier Transicold helps improve global transport and shipping temperature control with a complete line of equipment for refrigerated trucks, trailers and containers, and is a part of UTC Climate, Controls & Security, a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE: UTX).

More than 100 engineers from Carrier Transicold’s UK network of service partners have already taken the course to-date in 2012, with all engineers expected to complete it by May 2012.

The training, designed and developed by Carrier Transicold UK in conjunction with an external consultant, takes engineers through current regulations and topics, including the recognition, diagnosis and control of potential electrical hazards, job planning, protective equipment and the reinforcement of best working practices.

Scott Dargan, operations director, Carrier Transicold UK, said, "Current building regulations mean that to move or install a domestic plug socket you have to be a qualified electrician; yet, ironically, there is no equivalent qualification required for the electrical work engineers carry out in a commercial capacity on transport refrigeration equipment.

"As a company, we continually raise standards as we not only want our teams to work safely; we want customers to know that when an engineer representing Carrier Transicold arrives at their site, they are trained and properly equipped to complete the work swiftly, safely and competently."

The introduction of this course reflects ongoing investment by Carrier Transicold and its network service partners in training that goes beyond what is required by industry legislation.

Ross Thompson, network operations manager, Carrier Transicold UK, added, "Transport refrigeration systems have changed in recent times. In addition to the commercial AC (Alternating Current) supply powering the standby systems and associated controls, many of today’s systems also operate AC generators that can produce up to 600 volts when in road operation, which, if not correctly serviced or maintained, can raise the risk of serious injury or even fatality."

The course is currently in the process of being accredited by City & Guilds. For more information on Carrier Transicold, visit www.carriertransicold.eu

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